Posted by: Tony Carson | 1 October, 2007

On snoring and tennis balls

Living with someone who snores?

Try this.

Put a tennis ball in a sock, and then safety pin the sock to the middle of the back of a T-shirt. When you sleep in this T-shirt, it’s painful to sleep on your back, so you turn on your side, where you’re less likely to snore. If you sleep with the sock enough, your sleep self will supposedly associate sleeping on your back with pain, and you won’t need the T-shirt anymore.

I’m not used to sleeping with a shirt on, so this—not to mention the heavy sock tugging at the back—took some getting used to. Also, it is surprisingly painful to have a Wilson jut into your back. But the remedy worked immediately. The morning after the first night, Elizabeth reported no snoring. I felt great, too. The second night, my deceitful sleep self did manage to outmaneuver the sock, swinging the tennis ball between my arm and side, allowing me to sleep on my back and snore. But the next day I adjusted the sock so that it was tighter against the shirt and could not be stretched out. For the rest of the trial, there was no snoring.

By the fifth night, I was attached to the ensemble. There was something ritualistic about putting the shirt on every night, and the thought of moving on to test another remedy made me sad. Elizabeth loved it, too. Improbably, she even found the get-up cute, which solidified this remedy’s place as the clear winner.

From Slate: The search for the ultimate snoring remedy.

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Responses

  1. Here’s a less painful alternative that has proven successful for me in the last week. I rolled up a pair of socks into a ball, and stuffed them into my briefs, at the top of my tailbone. It doesn’t *hurt* to roll over, or to lie on my back, but it’s uncomfortable enough to my sleeping self that I always end up on my side. For the first time in years, my wife reports almost complete absence of my snoring.

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  3. Snoring is a fairly common affliction, affecting 40 percent of men and 25 percent of women. If you snore, you make a raspy, rattling, snorting sound while you breathe during sleep. Older people are particularly prone to snoring: About one-third of people ages 55 to 84 snore.’

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